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Step 1. Ask a Searchable Question

Our work, our practices, our teams are driven by questions. It's often the case that these questions start out as ideas that need to be refined in order for them to yield meaningful answers.

 

In this section, you'll:
  • Recognize the value of asking a searchable question
  • Identify common types of questions (background/foreground)
  • Describe different frameworks that help to identify key concepts within your research topic
  • Construct a searchable question using a standard framework (e.g. PICO, SPICE, SPIDER)

Recognize the value of asking searchable questions

‚ÄčDeveloping a clear, focused research question is at the heart of the research process and is the first critical step when seeking out evidence. A question, when thoughtfully constructed, will:

 

Examples of well-formulated, searchable questions:

Formulating questions is an iterative process, requiring revising and refining, through investigation and reflection.

 

Take a moment to think about a question that you have:
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Jot down what you already know, what you need to find out, and why you are asking the question.

 

By asking what needs to be known and for what purpose, you'll identify both background and foreground questions which we will explore next.

Don't have a question? Follow along with the provided examples to learn more.